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Saturday, August 1, 2020 | History

5 edition of Nickel and its role in biology found in the catalog.

Nickel and its role in biology

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Published by M. Dekker in New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Nickel -- Physiological effect,
  • Nickel -- Environmental aspects,
  • Nickel -- Health aspects

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographies and index.

    Statementedited by Helmut Sigel with Astrid Sigel.
    SeriesMetal ions in biological systems ;, v. 23
    ContributionsSigel, Helmut., Sigel, Astrid.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsQP532 .M47 vol. 23, QP535.N6 .M47 vol. 23
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxxix, 488 p. :
    Number of Pages488
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL2405537M
    ISBN 100824777131
    LC Control Number87036498

      EARLY ZINC RESEARCH. The first hint that zinc played an important role in life processes came in , when the mineral was found to be essential for the growth of a fungus, Aspergillus was a chemist from the University of Lyon, France, Professor Jules Raulin, who reported in that zinc was needed for the growth of this organism. Nickel is known primarily for its divalent compounds with all common anions, i.e. halides, hydroxide, sulfate, carbonate, carboxylates, sulfide and hydroxide. Green and blue are the characteristic colors of its compounds. Important nickel(II) compounds include: Oxides. Nickel oxide, NiO is a powdery green solid that becomes yellow on.

    Fourteen articles by leading researchers constitute the first book exclusively devoted to the biological utilization of nickel. The articles range from the chemistry and physics of nickel complexes in general to the roles of this metal in cellular catalytic phenomena. The books purpose is to provide extensive background for non- specialists, as well as insight into the possible . In its pure form iron is a fairly soft, grayish metal. It is very reactive and will readily corrode or rust. It is malleable and a decent conductor of electricity and heat. Iron is the most naturally magnetic of the elements. Other naturally magnetic elements include cobalt and nickel.

    Nickel is a silvery-white metallic element found in the earth’s crust. It can be combined with other elements to form nickel compounds. Because of its unique properties, nickel has many industrial uses. Most nickel is used in metal alloys because it imparts useful properties, such as corrosion resistance, heat resistance, hardness, and strength. Mg as a dissociable cofactor. This role of magnesium is discussed in greater detail in Chap. 7. Some specific processes in higher plants where Mg performs an essential function are discussed below. Photosynthesis The most well-known function of Mg in plants is its role as the cen-tral atom in the tetrapyrrole ring of both the chlorophyll File Size: KB.


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Nickel and its role in biology Download PDF EPUB FB2

ISBN: OCLC Number: Description: xxix, pages: illustrations ; 24 cm. Contents: 1. Nickel in the Natural Environment 2. This book considers nickel in the environment and in aquatic systems and outlines its role for plants. It discusses the toxicology of nickel compounds and the role of nickel in carcinogenesis, focusing on the analysis of nickel in biological materials and the related difficulties.

Metal Ions in Biological Systems is devoted to increasing our understanding of the relationship between the chemistry of metals and life processes. The volumes reflect the interdisciplinary nature of bioinorganic chemistry and coordinate the efforts of researchers in the fields of biochemistry, inorganic chemistry, coordination chemistry, environmental chemistry.

Volume 2 focuses on the vibrant research area concerning nickel as well as its complexes and their role in Nature. With more than 2, references and over illustrations, it is an essential resource for scientists working in the wide range from.

nickel carbonyl, a carcinogenic gas that results from the reaction of nickel with heated carbon monoxide, from cigarette smoke, car exhaust, and some industrial based enzyme system is well known and plays an important role not only in life process but also in the global biological carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen cycles.

Nickel is. Nickel, an Historical Review Nickel and its role in biology book Buller Howard-White No preview available - References to this book. Metal Ions in Biological Systems: Volume Nickel and its Role in Biology Helmut Sigel, Astrid Sigel Limited preview - Ullmann's.

The nickel sites in enzymes exhibit extreme plasticity in nickel coordination and redox chemistry. The metal center in SOD must be able to redox processes with potentials that span from + to − mV (), whereas in MCR and CODH, it must be able to reach potentials as low as − mV (); thus, nickel centers in proteins perform redox chemistry over a potential.

Nickel is an essential trace element for many species. Chicks and rats raised on nickel-deficient diets have liver problems. Enzymes known as hydrogenases in bacteria contain nickel. Nickel is also important in plant ureases. Levels in humans.

The abundances of the elements in humans. Human abundance by weight: ppb by weight. Nickel plays a role in the cells of plants and some microorganisms.

It is sometimes added to glass to give it a green color. The nickel-titanium alloy nitinol has the ability to remember its shape. After changing its shape (bending it), it will return to its original shape when heated.

About 39% of the nickel used each year comes from recycling. Nickel is an essential ultra‐micronutrient for higher plants and some cyanobacteria. The best known function in higher plants is its role in the active center of the enzyme urease, but at least one by now well‐known additional function is the deterrence of herbivores in Cited by: Nickel is a silvery-white metal with a slight golden tinge that takes a high polish.

It is one of only four elements that are magnetic at or near room temperature, the others being iron, cobalt and Curie temperature is °C ( °F), meaning that bulk nickel is non-magnetic above this temperature. The unit cell of nickel is a face-centered cube with the lattice Group: group Nickel in Soils and Plants brings together discussions on Ni as a trace element and as a micronutrient essential for plant growth and its role in plant physiology.

It analyzes the biogeochemistry of Ni at the soil plant interface, and explains its behavior in the rhizosphere resulting in Ni deficiency or toxicity, or Ni tolerance of various Ni. In biology, nickel is a major trace element and part of the catalytic centers of many important metabolic enzymes.

Nickel is one of the most important trace metals in biology. While its concentration in most rocks is only between 10 and µg g −1, it is highly enriched in ultramafic rocks, like peridotite and serpentine (Sigel et al., ).

The fascinating world of the role of metals in biology, medicine and the environment has progressed significantly since the very successful Second Edition of the book published in Beginning with an overview of metals and selected nonmetals in biology, the book supports the interdisciplinary nature of this vibrant area of research by.

Biological Inorganic Chemistry: A New Introduction to Molecular Structure and Function, Second Edition, provides a comprehensive discussion of the biochemical aspects of metals in living ing with an overview of metals and selected nonmetals in biology, the book then discusses the following concepts: basic coordination chemistry for biologists; structural and.

Volume 2 focuses on the vibrant research area concerning nickel as well as its complexes and their role in Nature.

With more than references and over illustrations, it is an essential resource for scientists working in the wide range from inorganic biochemistry all the way through to medicine. In 17 stimulating chapters, written by 47 internationally recognized experts, Price: $ Issues such as the key role of nickel in pathogens, nickel toxicity in humans and the potential medical applications are also examined.

Written by internationally leading experts in nickel biology and chemistry research, this book is an essential reference for bioinorganic chemists, biochemists, biologists and medicinal : Hardcover. Issues such as the key role of nickel in pathogens, nickel toxicity in humans and the potential medical applications are also examined.

Written by internationally leading experts in nickel biology and chemistry research, this book is an essential reference for bioinorganic chemists, biochemists, biologists and medicinal chemists.

The last five chapters of the book include important information about the assembly of nickel into metallocenters, Ni-dependent gene expression,and the role of nickel in pathogenesis and tox-icity. Chapon SlyD,covers the literature on this protein up to ; however,the link to nickel metabolism does not become clear until late in the.

Nickel is a transition element extensively distributed in the environment, air, water, and soil. It may derive from natural sources and anthropogenic activity.

Although nickel is ubiquitous in the environment, its functional role as a trace element for animals and human beings has not been yet recognized.

Environmental pollution from nickel may be due to industry, the use of liquid and Author: Giuseppe Genchi, Alessia Carocci, Graziantonio Lauria, Maria Stefania Sinicropi, Alessia Catalano.

Heavy metals are generally defined as metals with relatively high densities, atomic weights, or atomic criteria used, and whether metalloids are included, vary depending on the author and context. In metallurgy, for example, a heavy metal may be defined on the basis of density, whereas in physics the distinguishing criterion might be atomic number, while a.

A comprehensive reference to nickel chemistry for every scientist working with organometallic catalysts Written by one of the world?s leading reseachers in the field, Nickel Catalysis in Organic Synthesis presents a comprehensive review of the high potential of modern nickel catalysis and its application in synthesis.

Structured in a clear and assessible manner, Author: Sensuke Ogoshi.contents METAL IONS IN LIFE SCIENCES Volume 2 Nickel and Its Surprising Impact in Nature edited by Astrid Sigel1, Helmut Sigel1, and Roland K. O. Sigel2 1University of Basel, Switzerland 2University of Z¿rich, Switzerland (1) Biogeochemistry of Nickel and Its Release into the Environment by Tiina M.

Nieminen1, Liisa Ukonmaanaho1, Nicole Rausch2 and William .